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  • Blog Entries

    • Maximilian Kolbe
      By Maximilian Kolbe in The CH Times 4
      One Dozen CH Times
      That is correct,  we have made it to the grand total of 12 editions of The CH Times! It has been a fantastic journey so far, one that I hope continues for a long time after this issue. Anyways, you are all probably rather curious at what the feature is because the truth is I have never really stuck to a regular process, using both fiction and non-fiction to lead it out. So without further ado, let me give to you the work of @Halfling Sized Ranger writing about John Williams!!!
       
       
      John Williams
      John Williams was born on February 8th, 1932 (He turned 88 a few days ago), in Floral Park, New York.  His parents were Johnny and Esther Williams. Johnny was a jazz muscian, so we can kind of see where John might have gotten his liking for music.  His grandparents on his dad's side were owners of a department store and his grandparents on his mom's side made cabinets. As John Williams put it, "People with those roots are not inclined to be lazy."  Well said, Williams, well said.
      In 1948, the family moved to California, more specifically Los Angeles.  John graduated from high school in 1950 and went to the University of California.  Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, an Italian composer, taught him some music privately.
      Moving on to the year 1952, he was drafted into the U. S. Air Force.  With his musical abilities, he would play piano and brass as well as conduct and arrange music for the band there (The U. S. Air Force Band).  In 1955, John moved on with his life. He went back to school so that he could study more music.
      When John starred his career as a composer, he had a particular style in his compositions.  It was most likely a type of neoromanticism, which was probably influenced by Tchaikovsky or Richard Wagner and the concepts of leitmotif.  His first score was for the 1958 B movie, Daddy-O, but he wasn't credited until 1960's Because They're Young. He was nominated for an Academy Award for his work in Valley of the Dolls (1967) and was nominated for another with Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969...good book, by the way).  He won an Academy Award for Fiddler on the Roof (1971).
      In 1974, Steven Spielberg asked Williams to compose the music for Spielberg's debut film, The Sugarland Express.  They teamed up again to create the thriller, Jaws, and probably one of the most iconic themes ever. When George Lucas was looking for a composer, Spielberg nudged him in Williams' direction.  Together, Lucas and Williams created another universe in "a galaxy far, far away" (More commonly known as Star Wars, people). Honestly, who can forget the yellow words floating off into space as the Main Theme played or when Anakin fought Kenobi on Lava Planet while Duel of the Fates blared?
      John went on to do Superman (1978), the Indiana Jones franchise, E. T.: the Extra-Terrestrial, Jurassic Park, Saving Private Ryan, the Harry Potter franchise, and many more.  He came back when George Lucas asked him to do the remaining SW movies.
      On a little side note, John Williams did marry an American singer and actress, Barbra Ruick.  Their three kids are Jennifer, Mark, and Joseph, the lead singer of Toto. Unfortunately, Barbra died and John married again in 1980.  This time, the woman was a photographer named Samantha Winslow.
      *Whew* If you've made it this far, give yourself a pat on the back and reward yourself by taking a quick break to do something you really like to do.  Go on a bike ride or a run. Write a snippet of that story you're in the middle of or, if you're supposed to be doing some school work right now, finish up with that before moving on.  As I have said before, I have a few favorite songs by John Williams that I would like to share with you. They're in no order of any sort. I also have some commentary on them and please leave some of your own if you feel like it.
      Even though I'm not a Star Wars fan like most of you are, I have to say the music is pretty good.  The Main Theme makes me feel like I can just jump into the air and fly. All I have to do to start flying is just one big jump.  Then, reality kicks in and I realize I'm a human. Humans can't fly. It's not possible for a human to fly on his own will power.  As the Imperial March blasts its tune, I can imagine storm troops and Darth Vader marching to its beat. Sometimes, they are marching through a wide hallway or through streets.  Otherwise, they're walking out of a space ship. I can see Anakin and Obi-Wan Kenobi fight to the tune of Duel of the Fates. They are on small pieces of rocks in the middle of a lava river.  I can also picture the fight between Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker.
      Imagine yourself walking on a sandy beach with ocean waves softly lapping the sand.  It's the perfect weather: blue skies, a bright sun, little white clouds. It's so perfect that you couldn't resist the urge to walk on the beach and listen to the waves and seagulls.  A little ways out, you see a fairly small yacht bobbing up and down. You look to the left and see a dorsal fin zigzagging its way over to the boat. You are about to shout a warning, though the yacht is probably too far away, when a monster sized shark jumps out of the water.  It eats everyone on the yacht and the yacht is left to sink. Add the Jaws Main Theme and you got yourself a horror movie about a man eating, boat destroying shark. Speaking of which, I put this on my I-should-watch-it list, but I have to check with my parents first.
      The only thing I can say about the Fanfare Medley is that I can't help humming along to it.  I was honestly surprised to find out he wrote it.
      I can't really say anything about my absolute favorite, the Jurassic Park Theme.  It's the most beautiful theme I think I have heard. I feel calm and, at the same time, awed as I see dinosaurs race through my imagination.  The Piano Guys' cover almost had me welling up with tears when I listened to it the first time. It's just beautiful...
      John Williams has made some amazing music over the years.  I respect him in every sense of the word. He is a genius, a mastermind of music.  From horror movies to fantasy to action to an Olympic medley, he has written a lot of music for us to enjoy.  I think he deserves the title of King of the Cinematic Music.
       
       
      If you like Cinematic music, I must say one really good song to listen to is called Cinematic and it is by Owl City, highly recommend. XD But I am rambling, I also would like to give you an article about the very entertaining Super Bowl which many of you will remember by @Big Nick!!!
       
       
      Super Bowl LIV
      The Chiefs are Super Bowl LIV Champions. They defeated the San Francisco 49ers on Feb 2 in one of the greatest games on turf. The Chiefs won 31-20 making a historic comeback in the 4th quarter after being down 20-10. Though not playing his best game Patrick Mahomes II went 26/42, threw for 286 yards and 2 touchdowns, and ran for 29 yards and another touchdown. Patrick was also named the Super Bowl MVP. Which made him the youngest player to win this award at just 24 years old. After the Super Bowl Kansas City Chief defensive lineman, Derick Nnadi paid for the adoption fees for every dog in the KC pet project at an animal shelter in Kansas City. Which means every dog available for adoption st that shelter can go home with a family for free.



       Though being one of the greatest Super Bowls it was not without controversy. From controversy over the MVP winner to the halftime show. There is a lawsuit pending over the halftime show featuring Shakira and J Lo. A man named Dave Daubenmire is suing the NFL and Pepsi ( who funded the halftime show) $87 trillion saying that disgusting acts where poured into millions of God-fearing peoples’ homes. Even with the controversy this is still one of the greatest show on turf.
       
       
      @AwesomeSauce15 is going to tell us all about some recent trades in baseball.
      Mookie Betts and David Price traded to Dodgers
       
                Mookie Betts says farewell to Boston after he along with teammate David Price were traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers in a three-way trade; that contained the Dodgers, Red Sox, and the Twins. The Red Sox are getting Alex Verdugo; from the Dodgers, and Brusdar Graterol, from the Twins. Kenta Maeda, previously a pitcher for the Dodgers is now traveling to Minnesota to begin the 2020 season as a pitcher for the Twins. Mookie Betts was the AL’s 2018 MVP, while David Price is a five time All Star and won the Cy Young Award in 2012. David Price is reported to still have 96 million on his contract with the Red Sox and they have agreed with the Dodgers to pay half of it, which is 48 million dollars. Last year Mookie Betts hit .295 and was just shy of 30 home runs with 29. He also had 80 RBI’s and led the league with 135 runs scored in 2019. David Price did not have a very good pitching season last year, he had his worst ERA of his career, 4.28, and went only 7-5 in his starts. The Dodgers are hoping with the acquiring of Betts and Price to actually win the World Series this year.
       
       

      What’s up with Pluto?
       
      By an anonymous member of Catholic Harbor
       
           You may have learned the planets of our solar system using some mnemonic like this: My Very Educated Mother Just Showed Us Nine Planets. The last word, “planets”, obviously stands for Pluto, a small celestial body of ice and rock at the edge of our galaxy. However, while included in this mnemonic as a planet, Pluto has been classified as a dwarf planet. However, debate is still raging over whether Pluto should be a planet or not. To look into this, we first need to learn more about Pluto.
           The problem all started because from the beginning the definition of a planet was rather loose: if it was big enough to be seen and orbited the sun (or earth, if you lived more than 300 years ago), then it was a planet. Thus, when Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto in 1930, Pluto was easily put into the planet club.
           As time went on, Pluto’s size was being clarified, making it much smaller than originally estimated (Pluto’s actual size is slightly smaller than our moon). In addition, with better telescopes, astronomers also started to find objects that had a similar size and composition to Pluto in Pluto’s vicinity, and wondered if they were related.
           Soon enough, scientists classified the millions of icy bodies at the far edge of our solar system (including Pluto) as being in the Kuiper (pronounced “kai-per”) Belt. Pluto, as the largest member of the Kuiper Belt, kept its status as a planet.
           But this is not the first time something like this has happened.
           Ceres (pronounced “series”), now a dwarf planet, was discovered in 1801 between Mars and Jupiter and at that time, despite being small, was classified as a planet. In the years following, other objects were discovered around Ceres, being of similar size and composition, and were also classified as planets. (At one point there were actually eleven recognized planets.) Soon, however, more and more similar bodies were discovered around Ceres and more information was discovered about them. This made astronomers reclassify Ceres and all the other similar bodies around it as asteroids, which are in the asteroid belt that we know today.
           Back to Pluto. Pluto remained a planet since it still was the largest member of the Kuiper Belt. However, in 2005 Eris was discovered. Eris was one of those bodies that was similar to Pluto and in its vicinity. When discovered, Eris was thought to be slightly larger than Pluto. (However, with New Horizons flying by Pluto in 2015 Eris was actually discovered to be slightly smaller than Pluto.) Nevertheless, astronomers thought Eris was larger and so they either had to name Eris as the tenth planet or classify it (and Pluto along with it) as a dwarf planet. To solve this problem and the overall problem of what exactly is a planet, the International Astronomical Union formally defined the word “planet” in 2006.
           Now, for an object in the Solar System to be named a planet, three requirements are necessary:
             1. The object must be in orbit around the Sun.
      2. The object must be massive enough to be rounded by its own gravity. More specifically, its own gravity should pull it into a shape defined by hydrostatic equilibrium
      3. It must have cleared the neighborhood around its orbit. 
           With Eris and Pluto not fitting the third requirement of the new definition they were reclassified as dwarf planets, and Ceres was re-reclassified from simply being an asteroid to a dwarf planet asteroid.
           The debate about whether Pluto should be a planet is less about Pluto (although some are swept away by Pluto’s “heart”) and more about what should be a planet. Some have proposed lax requirements that would increase the number of planets from eight to more than 100. However, as far as I know it is simply opinion about what should and should not be a planet, since the definition is a variable and can be changed.
           Nevertheless, until the definition of a planet changes again, Pluto is officially a dwarf planet, leaving four terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars) and four gas giants (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) in our solar system, along with the asteroid belt, Kuiper Belt, scattered discs, comets, space junk, and everything else we may or may not have discovered.
       
      Sources (also great for further reading):
      https://www.space.com/43-pluto-the-ninth-planet-that-was-a-dwarf.html
      https://nineplanets.org/pluto/
      https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/dwarf-planets/pluto/overview/
       
       
      Now, I would have someone cover the impeachment but it was an absolute joke and hence not worth giving the space to. However, if you want to hear about something that is actually funny, read the following thing that happened to me:
       
      Some of you may know that I am a member of Seton Writer's Club (which for anyone curious is not run by Seton and hence Seton cannot be held responsible for anything that happens there). I do not get to go on a ton since I am a Moderator on here and hence this takes up a lot of my Internet attention. I may not have even been on at all though if it were not for CH. For as a matter of fact, I originally signed up in 2016 but barely ever used it, not logging in for years! Then upon joining CH I gave it another shot and have since become semi active on there with this still taking up most of my time. However, this bit of activity nevertheless allowed me to note that there was a slogan competition going on for which they wanted sign ups, so I made one. Lo and behold, despite 20 some slogans being submitted and it being done anonymously by popular vote, the one I created won! Hence it is considered a bit of a joke that a Moderator on Catholic Harbor created the slogan for Seton Writer's Club, a very similar site in some ways and drastically different in others to the point that there is kind of a joke that they are minor rivals. XD However, they seem to work well together with a lot of similar members, and apparently a major CH member can even make a difference on SWC and vice versa. I mean, look at all the writing @Halfling Sized Ranger does for The CH Times and yet she has been on SWC for much longer than CH. Together, we can work together for a bigger and brighter future for both communities!
       
      @Mr. Rock had an interesting idea, see it below:
       
      Fun fact Q&A of the month:
      Why do we say "hello" when we answer the telephone?
      The first word used to answer the phone was the nautical greeting "ahoy", because the first regular phone system was in the maritime state of Connecticut. Alexander Graham Bell, the  inventor, answered with the Gaelic "hoy", but it was Thomas Edison's greeting of "hello", an exclamation of surprise dating back to the Middle Ages, that caught on, and so we answer today with "Hello?"
      (Taken from Doug Lennox's The Little Book of Answers)
       
      Now this is short, but it is sweet, I think this turned out quite nicely, and it is possible there will be more added so make sure to check back in soon!
      Until later God bless you!
      Matthew
       

       
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